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this was an utter, unmitigated disaster for the security of the united states and for the interest of the united states in the dangerous world we live in. the sanctimonious comments by general holder today are this, self-serving and self-centered. we ought to be concerned of what is in the interest of the united states of america. you nailed it absolutely right. what good is there to be gained by trying these mass murderers, war criminals in civilian courts with rules designed for conventional crimes committed by conventional criminals as general mukazie once said. they'll challenge the way they were treated and what about the chain of evidence and did we have all the constitutional nicities in a war? they're going to proclaim outrageous treatment and lie about it because they've got the world stage and this will serve to recruit additional jihaddists because they're going to attack america throughout this entire episode, the sorry episode and they're going to try and get support throughout the muslim world for their cause by ex-core eighting -- excoriating the united states of america and our v
're unique here in the united states of america. madam speaker, we're a unique people and, yes, we are the progeny of western europe and we're the progeny that came from primarily western european stock and at the time that we received the best that western europe had to offer, we also received a fundamental christian faith as the core of our moral values. and this is a judeo-christian nation, madam speaker. the core of our moral values is embodied within the culture. whether people of whatever church people go to or whether they go to church, wherever they worship or whether they worship, we still have the american people as a culture who understand christian values and christian principles, the judeo-christian values that are timeless. and so i would illustrate that, madam speaker, in this way. that when -- an example would be this, let's just say if an honorable man from texas were to pull into his driveway and his neighbor's dog had gotten loose and ran underneath the tire of his car and if he killed -- if you're in texas or iowa or most of the places in the country, if you run
of the world's challenges cannot be solved unless the united states and china work together rts. >> reporter: but there was another challenge, how to address china's record on human rights. the president broached the topic at a town hall meeting with university students in shanghai earlier in the day. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the principless that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, of access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. they should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> reporter: following past practice for such events chinese authorities detained dozens of human rights activists in advance of the president's visit. mr. obama did not mention the crackdown but he did chide the chinese government for internet censorship. china has 250 million internet users but also employs the world's tightest controls over web access. >> i am a
of the international community but fully engage with the international community and the united states is the one who can do the heavy lifting. there is no question about that. >> rose: and john harris of gives us a one-year analysis of the oa administration. >> the idea that president obama and his team were able to somehow transform the map and transform the political geography of this country or the political demography of this country, that just doesn't look to be the case. they did redraw the map in 2008. it was an he norly impressive victory. but that doesn't mean that they have somehow fundamentally altered the landscape in permanent ways. >> and job grisham is here with a new book, a collection of short stories. >> it is more about people. more about the small town people. many of whom are struggling. many of whom have had a lot of miss erie, a lot of hope. it's about small town lawyers and the crazy things they do out of desperation. all stuff i saw firsthand many years ago. >> rose: mohamed elbaradei, john harris, john grisham next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provid
to the import of work ahead, and thank you for coming today. may god continue to bless the united states of america. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> still to come, a discussion on attorney general eric holder's announcement to hold civilian trial support 9/11 plotters in new york city. after that, today's memorial service for pulitzer prize winner jack nelson. later, another chance to see former president george w. bush reflect on his a-year presidency and decisions made during his administration. the u.s. house is back in session tomorrow at 2:00 eastern for legislative business. live coverage of the house is on c-span. the senate also returns tomorrow, continuing work on fiscal year 2010 federal spending for the veterans department and military construction. majority leader harry reid has said the senate may began its healthcare debate later in the week. the senate will gavel in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. live coverage on c-span2. >> c-span's 2010 student camp contest is here. the top prize is $5,
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
years between iran and the united states in geneva last month. he is now involved in the draft agreement between iran, the united states, russia and france to process iran's uranium stockpiles outside the country. there are reports today that progress on the deal is being held up by iran's ongoing internal political crisis. this week dr. elbaradei called the current mont a unique and fleeting opportunity to reverse course from confrontation to cooperation with iran. we want to talk about all of that and i am very pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> charlie, it is great to be here again. >> rose: all right. let me just start. tell me where you think the moment is. >> well, the moment is a historic critical moment, charlie, that this is for the first time i see a genuine desire by the president of the united states and by the iranian leadership to engage in a genuine dialogue. it's after 50 years of animosity, of distrust. and that's why we have this difficulty today. the it is a symbolic gesture but it could be the first step in a broad dialogue that eventually could integ
to terrorist organizations, that directly threaten the security of the united states, it is essential that our government agencies are sharing information about such individuals. what happens been in the media these last days about major hasan and his behavior, if determined to be true, is very disturbing. such allegations as justifying suicide bombing on the internet, lecturing fellow soldiers using jihadist rhetoric, warning about adverse events if muslims were not allowed to leave military service, repeatedly seeking counsel from a radical islamic imam with well-known ties to al-qaeda. attempting to convert some of his patients who were suffering from stress disorders to his distorted view of islam and finally, was the fbi sharing with the army what it knew about hasan and aulaqi and was the army sharing what it knew about hasan with the fbi? while these patterns are preliminary and will be confirmed by the the investigations that are being conducted, it is very similar to what we experienced at fort bragg in the late '90s where we were wrongfully tolerating extremists in our organization w
is that the financial crisis of last year has shaken the chinese perception of the ability of the united states to run the international system so that the chinese are becoming-- especially in the economic field-- a lot more assertive than they have ever been before. >> rose: we conclude this evening with melinda gates talking about global health, the bill and melinda gates foundation, and the relationship between the two of them. >> i just can't tell you how when, you know, i'll come back from the developing world, the first person i want to talk to and the first person that wants to talk to me is bill. he wants to hear what i've learned, hear what i'm excited about, i want to tell him what i'm excited about, tell him what i saw, tell him what isn't going as well as we thought. and the same thing. when he comes from northern nigeria, he wants to tell me what he saw, what's going to be hard, how do we think about this? to be doing that together is both satisfying but to be working on something that you're so deeply passionate about and that uses every piece of your mind and your heart. it does, it giv
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
on several cases against those who seek to terrorize the united states using the full range of authorities and capabilities available to us. just as president obama is using our military diplomatic, legal, law enforcement and moral force to make america safer and more secure, the attorney general is exercising his responsibilities in consultation with the secretary of defense to determine where and how best to seek justice against those who have attacked americans here at home and around the world. after nearly eight years of delay, may finally move -- be moving forward to bring to justice the perpetrators and murderers from the september 11 attacks. i have great confidence in our attorney general. the capability of our prosecutors, our judges, our juries and the american people. in this regard. i support the attorney general's decision to it pursue justice against khalid shaikh mohammed and four others accused of plotting the september 11 attacks and go after them in our federal courts in new york. they committed murder here in the united states and we'll seek justice here in the united s
to be friends. >> the united states does not seek to contain china nor does a deeper relationship of china mean a weakening of bilateral alliances. on the contrary. the rietz of a strong prosperous china can be a source of strength for community of nations. >> as parted of his charm offensive before midnight tonight eastern time about an hour, 45 minutes from now the president is scheduled to participate in a town hall style meeting with an audience of mostly young people in the big chinese city of shanghai with the latest on that from shanghai major garrett who is traveling with the president joins us. hey, major, what's the buzz on this town hall? is it expected to be adoring or confrontational? >>> oo it will probably be something in between. they are dickering or fighting over each other in the contours or consent to the town mall. to circumvent the election to control the events being imposed to president obama the white house invited and collected through the u.s. embassy questions through the web site for the past couple weeks. the president will get those unseen in the course of the tow
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
, including ethnic and regious minorities whether they e in the united states, cha or any nation. >> reporte following past actice for such event chinese ahorities detained dozens of human rits activists in vance of the presint's visit. mr. obama did not menti the crackdown but did chide the chine government for internet nsorship. china has 250 milon intert users but also employs the wod's tightest controls over web accs. >> i am a g believer in technoloy. and i'm a big liever in openns when it comes to the flow of informatn. i think that the morereely inrmation flows, the stronger the socie becom. because then citizens of countries arounthe world can hold their own governments accountable. ey can begin to think for themselves. that generates new ids. it encouages creativit >>orter: the president suggesteds communist rulers shou have nothing to fear fr more openness. heited criticism he faces at home. >> the truth is that becau in the united states information is free d i have a lot of itics in the uted states who can say all kinds of things out me, i actually think th that makes o democrac
basically has completely destroyed the power of the united states by his namby-pamby stuff on intelligence, by his huge budget deficit and gigantic expansion of the debt. he's made the united states into a beg ar nation. and if you like obama, you think he's weak. if you don't like him, you think he's just wrong and sometimes bad intentioned. i learned something the other day that just blew my minds. obama announced that he wasn't going to put missiles in poland, and he did that on september 17. now, apart from my wife's birthday, that date has no significance to me. but to the polls it does. it was the date russia invaded poland in 1939. and to remove the missile shield on that gate was effectively telling the russians, come on in, she's yours. and obama knew it. had to have known it. that state department would have flagged that and said don't do it on the 17th. he did it to send a message to russia saying, she's all yours, kid. sean: that's a frightening thought. dick, good to see you. don't forget, we're going to have the first cable exclusive interview with sarah palin on her brand-ne
interest of the united states it is urgently needed. the president knows achieving this goal will be difficult. he has said that he will not one of her -- waver in his pursuit in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his it ministration to the resumption of negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes thesuccess. the steps we have suggested to all parties to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends in themselves. they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. they can make a valuable contribution for achieving our goals of successful negotiations that result in a two-stage solution. that is why we urge the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action. it is why we have urged the arab state to take steps toward normalization. at the is what we have urged israel to stop activity. while they fall short, we feel the steps announced by the prime minister are significant and could have substantial impact on the ground. for the first time ever, an israeli government
of the september 11th hijackers and advocated jihad against the united states. and in a stunning change in the legal war on terror, the obama administration announced we'll try the master mind of 9/11, kalid shaikh mohammed and four others from guantanamo in a court in new york city. what's behind this decision and is it possible they will be acquitted? joining us columnist dan ettinger, editorial board member, dorothy rabid wits. >> everything in his life, that pointed to this, he said outrageous things at long lectures and the response was we have to let him do his things. >> at walter reed hospital. >> at walter reed and people sent him to of all things, school. they sent him to a university lecture place, he would be responsible to this. he carried a card that said soldier of islam we now discover. he-- >> people are seeing all of this. why didn't anybody blow the whistle? >> look, what's really happened is americans are not going to forget this happened. cowardess prevented anyone from interfering, the only word to use, drop political correctness. >> cowardess on who's part? >> on
jihad against the united states. and in a stunning change in the legal war on terror, the obama administration announced that it will try the mastermind of 9/11, khalid sheikh mohammed and four other enemy combatants at guantanamo in criminal court in new york city. what is behind this decision and is it possible they could be acquitted? joining the panel, "wall street journal" columnist and deputy editor dann henniger, editorial board member dorothy and columnist bill magurn. dorothy, was hasan a terrornist plain sight? why didn't people see that? >> the last question first. he was apparently. everything his life pointed to this, he said outrageous things at long lectures and the response was we have to let him do his thing. >> paul: this is a presentation at walter reed. >> walter reed hospital. and then people sent him to of all things school. sent him to a university lecture place, he would be responsive to this. he carried a card that said, "soldier of islam" we now discover. he seethed with hatred. >> paul: people are seeing all of this. why didn't anybody blow the whist w
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
, the president should be aware the jobs people are worried about in the united states are getting people back to work. we have 15 million people out of work. our priorities are skewed here. we have things to take care of her at home. why are we worrying about afghanistan? it really raises questions about the extent of the pentagon's influence on the administration. >> why do you think the president is doing it? many people thought the president came from the same side of the tracks that you're on, generally speaking, in terms of the limits of u.s. power in the world and the need to rejoin the world community and not to be hawkish. what do you make of his decision? why do you think he moved that direction? >> well, i think it's going to be a tough one to defend. and you're right about the -- we've seen the limits of u.s. coercion, and this government in afghanistan is a corrupt government. everyone knows that. sooner or later, the kind of consensus government which afghanistan has had historically is going to have to be reinstituted so people in afghanistan will have control over their own des
the cases should be brought. >> that assumes that the person is in the united states for one thing and he is not. let me close with this point. you said, and this really bothers me, mr. attorney general, with all due respect. for eight years justice has been delayed for the victims of the 9/11 attacks. i want to put in the record, mr. chairman, ask unanimous consent to enter justice delayed by andrew mckarthy and i'll quote two paragraphs from this. this is chutzpah at large, he writes. the reason there were so few military trials is the tireless campaign conducted by leftist lawyers to derail military tribunals by challenging them in the courts. many of those lawyers are now working for the obama justice deputy and that includes holder who volunteered his services to at least 18 of america's enemies and lawsuits they brought to the american people and it concludes within two years ksm and four fellow war criminals stood ready to plead guilty and proceed to execution and then the obama administration blew into washington. want to talk delay? obama shut down the commission by pleading guil
the united states senate votes on whether to let debate on the health care reform bill begin. the republicans are all voting nay. if the democrats can't get 60 votes, that's it. it's over. it looks like they can do it. health care leaves the senate station. the top of the show tonight. >>> plus president obama has his chin out on just about every hot issue out there. health care, terror trials, job losses, even the breast cancer report. he is exposed and vulnerable. his poll numbers are dropping. is he just too darned intellectual? too much the egg head? why did he bow to that japanese emperor? why did he pick tim geithner to be his economic front man? why all of this dithering over afghanistan? and who thought it was a wonderful idea to bring the killers of 9/11 to new york city? the media capital of the world to tell their story? is obama channeling adlai stevenson? and 46 years after the jfk assassination, sunday is the anniversary. we are still learning fascinating details in the frantic hours after the shooting. especially about lbj. the author of a new book on the kennedy assassination
. >> do you believe you are capable and can do the job of the president of the united states? >> we will preview my interview with governor palin in the body language segment. don't miss this one. bill: hi, i am bill o'reilly. rough month for president obama. while he had difficulty trying to convince the chinese government to act civilized, nothing he faces when he returns home tomorrow. ft. hood and afghanistan and health care all put the president on the defensive. his approval rating has dropped below 50% for the first time. but he is a shrewd guy. he made himself available while in asia. >> will you sign legislation on health care that includes the stew pact language? >> i thank you is a balance to be achieved that is consistent with the amendment, what existed before we reformed health care. i believe in the basic idea that federal dollars should not pay for abortions. but i also think we should not restrict women's choices. >> does the language strike that balance? >> not yet. bill: the president wants it both ways. he knows forcing pro-life taxpayers to fund abortion is wron
five men that planned the attacks of 9/11 will face justice in the united states. just blocks from where the world trade center used to stand. some college victory for the rule of law. others call it a slap in the face. eric holder show that he was not about to apologize for the decision when some of the senators went after him. here is an example. >> you talked about the best chances to prosecute, one of the factors has to be that he has at least at some point asked to plead guilty. you must have taken that into account. >> that was then. i do not know what he wants to do now, and i will not base the determination on what a murderer wants to do. he will not select the prosecution venue, i will select it, and i have. shepard: the murderer said that he wanted to die here. that was the beginning of the exchange. the attorney general extended his position, saying that the world will see collied shake muhammed for the tower that he is. -- holly shake muhammed -- collied shake muhammed for the murderer that he is. >> the administration said that they were not making this a law enforceme
. >> i am looking at this from the threat that this poses to the united states. i think it is unwise for the president to move these individuals and these trials into a civilian court in new york city. trace: security concerns are not the only issue. consider the context for millions of americans who live and work in new york. this decision has profound and personal implications for them because this was their city that was attacked. it was their family and friends who died. while some of those most affected will no doubt lineup to seek justice exacted on those accused of the crime, others argue the suspects and should never be allowed to set foot anywhere near the sacred earth of ground zero, where so many lives were lost. jamie colby has more reaction from family members. first, catherine herridge as live in washington. what is the effect of trying these suspects in civilian court? >> thanks. prosecutors in new york must begin anew. charges must be brought, the motions and the hearings. the militant -- the military courts are now null and void. once transferred, the five men, inclu
ahmadinejad. relations between the united states and iran have been troubled for years. and at the epicenter was the taking of american hostages. the 1970s tehran was an exotic blend of western ideas and conservative islamic values but in 1979 trouble was brewing when marines arrived. >> i was a marine security guard. i arrived at the embassy in august. we arrived around 10:00 at night and got into a bul bullet ridden van with quite a bit of burning of tires in the streets as we made our way from the airport to the embassy. >>> my first encounterer to iran was late night coming in with several other marines. the next morning i awoke to the koran being read over the loudspeakers. >> opened the windows and saw that the beautiful mountains of tehran. >> greta: john lindbergh and acting ambassador were career state department diplomats. >> the state department sent out a message asking for volunteers to go serve in tehran. i have been in iran before. i taught there, i spoke the langing. >> they needed someone in tehran and turned to me and said you are going there for four to six weeks. turned o
as a citizen of the united states is just appalling. i think eric holder should have left them in guantanamo bay and be tried there. i lived in new york in 2000 and 2001. it was just terrible. for them to be tried in a federal court, it just speaks to this country to give people that do not ware uniforms, do not apply to the geneva convention to come to our country and then be given rights like a citizen. host: david, in this newspaper article, attorney general holder elected to proceed with the first u.s. criminal prosecution alleged to have been directly involved in the plot eight years ago that targeted the world trade center and pent he gone because of his full confidence in the successful outcome. tell us why you are not as convinced of the outcome? caller: i'm not confident because i believe that in our country, people are innocent until proven guilty. when you use water boarding and all these things they are trying to use against ournqq governmen why should a terrorist be given rights in our country. host: let's go to the democratic line. caller: i think they should be tried here. t
with the united states as the only nation in the industrialize think world that does not guarantee health care to all people. yet we spend substantially more than any other country and our outcomes are worse. clearly we need major health care reform. >> that's a point of view from the liberal democrats. senator greg, what is the republican view on health care? how is it different from the democrat view? this is a strict party line vote we're seeing tomorrow night. >> well, clearly we disagree with senator sanders. i really respect bernie's forthrightedness. he is telling it like it is, a single payer system like the english or canadian system. we genuinely believe a single payer system will undermine the quality of health care in this country. and it is not affordable. this bill is a $2.5 trillion-dollar bill. that's what it spends when it is fully phased in over a ten-year period. it would if it led to a single payer system. and i happen to think it is a precursor to that. put the government in charge of every aspect of health care in a very direct way so that you would end up with basically
't have enough jails there why do we have any jails empty in the united states at taxpayer expense? maybe that's a whole another issue. why do we have a whole federal prison sitting there? is it because some of these prisoners in california are not federal prisoners? peter: only 200 minimum security prisoners at that facility at this point. and we don't mix state and federal prison population. gretchen: but we will bring terrorists there? on its face it seems weird to me that we wouldn't be able to find some use of this prison, instead of bringing some of the world's worst terrorists there. steve: and we were talking about whoever becomes members of that jury for can a lead sheik mohammed their families could be a target. the people of the surrounding area there in illinois, some of them feel like you bring these guys here then suddenly we will be the focus of jihadi and stuff like that. we don't like that. congressman kirk who is going to join us in 45 minutes wrote this letter to the administration. quote: steve: mark kirk is going to be joining us very promptly to talk about that gitmo
for afghanistan. >> the united states cannot be engaged in an open-ended commitment. >> his attorney general prosecutes the plot's masterm d mastermind. >> in a courthouse just blocks away from where the twin towers once stood. >> this is a big step in the wrong direction. >>> topics this morning for our headliners. secretary of state hillary clinton and former new york mayor, rudy giuliani. hillary and rudy only on "this week." >>> then -- >> we don't have to continue to go down this controversy road. >> she's back. >>> george will, gwen ifill of pbs. david brooks of "the new york "mother jones." corn from >>> and as always, the sunday funnies. >> before john mccain chose her as his running mate, his campaign spent $50,000 on a background check. when he heard this, john mccain said we should have spent $75,000. >>> and we begin today with the secretary of state hillary clinton. thanks for spending time with us this morning. >> it's a pleasure to talk with you from singapore, george. >> wel and as you're in singapore, you and the president are facing really his toughest decision yet on afg
of israelis and palestinians to live in peace and security. it is also in the interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows that achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not weaver and his persistent pursuit of comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. to be clear, the steps we have suggested to all parties -- israel, the palestinians, and the arab states -- to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends to themselves, and they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. but they can make a valuable contribution toward achieving our goal of successful negotiations that result in a two-state solution. that's why we've urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action on incitement. it's why we have urged the arab states to take steps toward normalization of relations w
are destroying the economy of the united states. this election is going to be interesting to see just tell the public is feeling. host: which races are you watching? caller: it is a foregone conclusion that virginia and creigh deeds ran a terrible campaign. the new york 23rd is traditionally a republican district. it will almost certainly go republican. a democrat has not won since 1850. corzine is a wall streeter. host: you would not bit surprised if corzine loses? the president has been there five times to campaign for him? the >> people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. -- caller: people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. they're not happy with corzine's leadership. host: let's hear from a voter voting in today's new york city mayor's race. who are you going to vote for? caller: thompson. chost: why is that? caller: mayor bloomberg is for the rich. when i went downtown, all the buildings were nothing but luxury buildings. people are getting a rent increase every single year. in one of his commercials, he said that crime is down in new york city. he did not m
by the position on the economy. i want to show you the map. this is the united states if you notice the elevation, the higher the state, the higher the unemployment rate. this is what happened last month, if the state is red, the rate went up last month. if the state is green, it came down a little bit in the last month. michigan has the highest in the country, but it came down a bit last month. nevada is high and it came down last month. look at all of the red. 29 states the rate went up last month. we asked in the cnn polling what do you think of economic conditions today? 82% say the economy is in bad shape and then you asked the follow-up question, politically who is to blame for this? right now 38% blame the republicans, 27% the democrats. in may it was 53% republicans and 21% democrats. so james carville if you're looking at that tep months or so in the obama administration. you see a trend in the polling. you're in charge now so you will get more in the blame. >> who are the 18% that didn't think it was bad. i'm curious about these people. >> you are. >> as you would expect that you get fu
. >> if they made this decision this would be unprecedented that the united states has used international law instead of our own constitution as the basis to adjudicate a case. >> amnesty international and a bunch of other organizations filed a brief argueing that because of customary international law the united states was bound already to follow the u.n. convention on the rights of the child that we haven't ratified as a country. i filed a brief opposing saying they have the international law wrong. more importantly, american law should govern america. >> some of our young people are lost souls in our country and we have to find a system to help get them on the right path. is what my risk start program is about, working withat risk children to h help get them on the right path, raising self-esteem and in stilling the discipline the kids are lack. that is what is wrong with so many kids today. they are lost souls and trying to make make a mark but the mark is in a devastating way. like the columbine. that is an example of kids who are lost that needed a right participant to get them on the r
portfolios over the largest bank holding companies of the united states accounting for about 2/3 of all the assets of the banking system. we were able to look across banks and examiners and asset classes and combined our usual examination procedures with off sight surveillance done by economists using a wide range of statistical methods. i think we learned a largement in that exercise -- large amount in that exercise. the confidence in the banking sector rose significantly but we also learned great deal about how to examine banks in a comprehensive way across the entire system. . i think, henry, i think going forward what we really need to know will be how to examine the system as a whole. i think one of the failures of regulatory oversight during the crisis was our -- when i talk about regulators in general, how individual firms and how each individual firm is doing. one of the things we've learned and very challenging for us as we go forward will be that we need to look at the whole system. we need to see how the markets have interact with each other. have interact with each other. we
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